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Professional Product Review Vol. 7 | Issue 1 | 2012 : Page 1

Volume 7 • Issue 1 2012 A Publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs In This Issue: Unbiased. Scientifically Sound. Clinically Relevant. User-Friendly. Letter from the Editor -David C. Sarrett, DMD In 2006, after two years of preparation, the ADA Professional Product Review was launched with the intent of providing ADA members with information compiled from the best available sources—information presented in a user-friendly way that is unbiased, clinically relevant and scientifically sound. That last point is a cornerstone of the newsletter as it is published under the auspices of the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs. The Council serves the public, the dental profession, and other health professions as the primary source of timely, relevant, and emerging information on the science of dentistry and the promotion of oral health. The Council also provides recommendations to the ADA’s policymaking bodies on scientific issues, and reviews, evaluates, and conducts studies on scientific matters. Over the past five years, the ADA Laboratories in Chicago have conducted numerous product evaluations—from LED curing units and flowable composites to digital radiography systems, CAD/CAM, and more than 70 types of restorative materials. Besides the test results, we’ve published panel discussions, extensive product survey data, product category “primers” and practitioner input. More recently, the Review has featured new topics that dentists requested—dental therapeutics and clinical techniques. We’ve brought together experts who teach, conduct research, or lecture in areas of restorative dentistry and new technologies so that we can help provide pertinent information for clinicians. All of these past Reviews are archived on ada.org/ppr. In the past year, we’ve also published collaborations conducted with dental schools and we are working to provide the results of efforts with other collaborators in future issues. The Review’s content is driven by the efforts of the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel dentists—a dedicated group of about 2000 ADA members who provide feedback on the products they currently use and products they would like the ADA Laboratories to evaluate. Responses to our reader surveys have also helped us refine the publication. Continued on page 2 Editor David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Chair, ADA Council on Scientific Affairs J. Timothy Wright, DDS Senior VP, Science/ Professional Affairs Daniel M. Meyer, DDS Senior Director, Research and Laboratories Gregory G. Zeller, DDS, MS Technical Editor Nina A. Koziol Manufacturers’ Liaison Tim O’Shea Letters to the Editor, Reprints and Permissions ppreditor@ada.org, 312.440.2840 Internet ada.org/ppr © American Dental Association, 2012. All rights reserved. An Evaluation of Selected Vinyl Polysiloxane (VPS) and VPS Hybrid Elastomeric Impression Materials 211 East Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 page 4 2012 Volume 7 • Issue 1 Dental Therapeutics: Great Question! Glad You Asked That! Dr. B. Ellen Byrne answers some perplexing questions about patient care. page 2 1

Letter from the Editor

David C. Sarrett, DMD

In 2006, after two years of preparation, the ADA Professional Product Review was launched with the intent of providing ADA members with information compiled from the best available sources—information presented in a user-friendly way that is unbiased, clinically relevant and scientifically sound. That last point is a cornerstone of the newsletter as it is published under the auspices of the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs. The Council serves the public, the dental profession, and other health professions as the primary source of timely, relevant, and emerging information on the science of dentistry and the promotion of oral health. The Council also provides recommendations to the ADA’s policy making bodies on scientific issues, and reviews, evaluates, and conducts studies on scientific matters.<br /> <br /> Over the past five years, the ADA Laboratories in Chicago have conducted numerous product evaluations—from LED curing units and flowable composites to digital radiography systems, CAD/CAM, and more than 70 types of restorative materials. Besides the test results, we’ve published panel discussions, extensive product survey data, product category “primers” and practitioner input. More recently, the Review has featured new topics that dentists requested—dental therapeutics and clinical techniques. We’ve brought together experts who teach, conduct research, or lecture in areas of restorative dentistry and new technologies so that we can help provide pertinent information for clinicians. All of these past Reviews are archived on ada.org/ppr. In the past year, we’ve also published collaborations conducted with dental schools and we are working to provide the results of efforts with other collaborators in future issues. <br /> <br /> The Review’s content is driven by the efforts of the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel dentists—a dedicated group of about 2000 ADA members who provide feedback on the products they currently use and products they would like the ADA Laboratories to evaluate. Responses to our reader surveys have also helped us refine the publication.<br /> <br /> All good publications do a routine self-examination to determine how best to supply their readership with current, useful information. What began as a 16-page, quarterly publication that was delivered bagged with JADA, enters a new chapter with this issue—JADA will include an Executive Summary of the Review while the full issue moves to online distribution on ada.org with plans for expanded content. I see this as a very positive move.<br /> <br /> In this issue, we have a dental therapeutics Q & A by Dr. B. Ellen Byrne, which looks at Prolia (denosumab), a new, non-bisphosphonate agent used for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women who are at high risk for fracture, and includes answers about a common question concerning ibuprofen dosages. You’ll also find an evaluation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) elastomeric impression materials, the results of tests conducted in the ADA Laboratories.<br /> <br /> They may not be the most glamorous products in the clinician’s armamentarium, but elastomeric impression materials are certainly in the bread-and-butter product category for many dentists. A survey of the ACE Panel indicates that the main concerns dentists have with elastomeric impression materials are their ability to reproduce fine detail, resist tearing, perform effectively in a wet field, and have long-term dimensional stability following disinfection. This report presents data on the physical properties of light-bodied and complementary heavybodied formulations for nine brands.<br /> <br /> Although the Review’s Executive Summary now appears within JADA’s covers, you can be assured that the full issue will continue to address clinical products, therapeutics, and techniques as a publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs. Questions or comments? Contact me at ppreditor@ada.org.

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