Shining Stars Winter 2012 : Page 7

Are Trampolines Safe for Your Backyard? Injury risks outweighs benefi ts If a famous professional baseball pitcher heard a chorus of voices after he dislocated his ankle while jumping on a trampoline with his son, he wasn’t dreaming. Soon after his injury became public, a chorus of doctors once again reminded parents of the dangers of trampolines—including Darshan Patel, M.D., Chief of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. “During the warmer months, we see at least one to two injuries in the ER per week related to trampolines,” says Dr. Patel. Injuries range from more common strains, contusions, and lacerations, to more serious fractures, head trauma or spinal cord injuries. “More than 50,000 Americans come to emergency rooms every year for injuries sustained on trampolines,” he says. “And those are the ones we know about.” Trampolines are especially dangerous for children, who Dr. Patel says become “little projectiles” when bounced around on the equipment. That is why the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend home use of trampolines for recreation, Dr. Patel says. “Trampolines should only be used under the supervision of a trained and qualifi ed professional in a proper setting, with only one person on the trampoline at a time,” he emphasizes. The trampoline should also have appropriate safety nets and pads that are checked regularly for tears and detachments. Because prevention is the best medicine, Dr. Patel urges parents to abandon their backyard trampolines in favor of other forms of exercise and recreation. “There are lots of other, safer ways for kids to fi nd entertainment and exercise during the warm summer months,” he says. Statistics suggest “bouncing” trampolines from your yard. Darshan Patel, M.D. Chief, Pediatric Emergency Department Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center “More than 50,000 Americans come to emergency rooms every year for injuries sustained on trampolines,” explains Dr. Patel. “And those are the ones we know about.” 7 Shining Stars

Are Trampolines Safe?

Injury risks outweighs benefits <br /> <br /> If a famous professional baseball pitcher heard a chorus of voices after he dislocated his ankle while jumping on a trampoline with his son, he wasn’t dreaming. <br /> <br /> Soon after his injury became public, a chorus of doctors once again reminded parents of the dangers of trampolines—including Darshan Patel, M.D., Chief of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. <br /> <br /> “During the warmer months, we see at least one to two injuries in the ER per week related to trampolines,” says Dr. Patel. Injuries range from more common strains, contusions, and lacerations, to more serious fractures, head trauma or spinal cord injuries. “More than 50,000 Americans come to emergency rooms every 7 Shining Stars year for injuries sustained on trampolines,” he says. “And those are the ones we know about.” <br /> <br /> Trampolines are especially dangerous for children, who Dr. Patel says become “little projectiles” when bounced around on the equipment. That is why the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend home use of trampolines for recreation, Dr. Patel says. “Trampolines should only be used under the supervision of a trained and qualified professional in a proper setting, with only one person on the trampoline at a time,” he emphasizes. The trampoline should also have appropriate safety nets and pads that are checked regularly for tears and detachments. <br /> <br /> Because prevention is the best medicine, Dr. Patel urges parents to abandon their backyard trampolines in favor of other forms of exercise and recreation. “There are lots of other, safer ways for kids to find entertainment and exercise during the warm summer months,” he says.

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