Lion May 2013 : Page 34

Out of the Den, Into Social Networks Lions are posting, tweeting, uploading and pinning. Here’s a snapshot of Lions’ recent social media activity. But don’t just sit there: start typing. It’s that easy to add your voice, advice and insights to the online community of Lions. Or maybe you just want to browse. The world of Lions awaits your roar or perhaps just your eyes. Lions Clubs International February 25 I need new ideas for induction of new members. Is there a standard for this or does it depend on the club? My club uses the blindfold and lights the candle, it's good but want new ideas. Like • Comment • Share 62 people like this. Katy Kastrouni I don’t understand what is the purpose of the blindfold and lighting a candle when there is a ceremony to induce a new member. And what is the meaning in that specific ceremony to recall Helen Keller ?? Please explain. Thank you. Michelle Morrell I just had mine earlier this month. The lights were turned off while they did the candle lighting. Each member of the club lit the candles. It was a nice ceremony. Mick Cockram In our club we use the Lion ceremony with all members, and partners attend this makes got a great social evening. We also encourage the new member to bring along a friend. It doesn't work all the time but it does spread the wonderful world of Lionism. Facebook Yep, Lions hang out with the popular crowd. The Lions Clubs International page has 79,792 likes and rapidly counting. Lions’ posts on Facebook run the gamut. Fort Belvoir Lions in Virginia recently shared inspiring photos of home improvements done for low-income families, Lions in India displayed a sizzling video of a flash mob used to raise awareness of diabetes, Lions offered tips on starting sponsorship of a Peace Poster contest, and Easton and Wilson Lions clubs in Pennsylvania told about an inspiring teenager and her guide dog. Hour after hour on Facebook, Lions share their successes, showcase their projects and discover inspiration and guidance. 34 LION MAY 2013 Frank Hewitt What a great suggestion. Since joining my club I have seen several variations of inductions take place. Some with the candles, some without. It looks nice and is impressive, but to the members that have been there a while it starts to become a boring routine. It's great to see some different and entertaining ideas. Abington MA Lions The blindfold and candles can only be understood if you hear the comments that go with them. The inductor tells the inductee that they have asked them to wear the blindfold for a brief time in order to appreciate the total darkness that is suffered every moment by the blind. He also tells them that he hopes this is the only time they have to endure the dark. The lighting of the candle shows the power of an individual. He points out that you can see how much brighter the world is with each candle added to the cause. Someone asked “why bring up Helen Keller at that time?” Although the Lions serve wherever and whenever needed, it is important to remember we had no direction to go until Helen Keller asked us to be her “knights of the blind” and eye sight and ending all forms of preventable blindness remains our primary objective. Symbolism and ritual? Perhaps. Overly dramatic? Not at all. We are each of us a candle trying to light the path out of darkness. Deedee Lee We bought about 3 dozen battery handheld candles for club members. All members stand around the inductees and we dim the lights. After the traditional blind fold ceremony, we remind all club members to make the new members feel welcomed at all future meetings. It is a nice feeling of being welcomed. The blindfold ceremony is on the LCI website. We do have a blind member in our club. The blindfold reminds us of the continuous world of darkness the blind experience daily. … It is a tradition in our club. Recently we put it to a vote to the members and it was unanimous to keep with tradition. I hope this sheds some light on a meaningful ceremony. w

Everybody’s Talking–Online

Out of the Den, Into Social Networks<br /> <br /> Lions are posting, tweeting, uploading and pinning. Here’s a snapshot of Lions’ recent social media activity. But don’t just sit there: start typing. It’s that easy to add your voice, advice and insights to the online community of Lions. Or maybe you just want to browse. The world of Lions awaits your roar or perhaps just your eyes.<br /> <br /> Facebook<br /> <br /> Yep, Lions hang out with the popular crowd. The Lions Clubs International page has 79,792 likes and rapidly counting. Lions’ posts on Facebook run the gamut. Fort Belvoir Lions in Virginia recently shared inspiring photos of home improvements done for low-income families, Lions in India displayed a sizzling video of a flash mob used to raise awareness of diabetes, Lions offered tips on starting sponsorship of a Peace Poster contest, and Easton and Wilson Lions clubs in Pennsylvania told about an inspiring teenager and her guide dog. Hour after hour on Facebook, Lions share their successes, showcase their projects and discover inspiration and guidance.<br /> <br /> Twitter<br /> <br /> You can buy attention through advertising or plead for attention through public relations. Or you can engage millions for free in 140 characters or less. The Lions Clubs International Twitter page has 34,216 followers. Be the 34,217th. Or, even better, tell Lions and others–short and sweet only permissible, of course–what’s happening in your den.<br /> <br /> Flickr<br /> <br /> If a photo is worth a thousand words, Flickr is worth 6,142,000 words to Lions. Lions have uploaded 6,142 photos to the Flickr page of Lions Clubs International. View them chronologically or via sets on the international president, missions, Hurricane Sandy relief, literacy projects and much more. Don’t bury your club photos in a dusty photo album. Post them for the world to admire.<br /> <br /> Pinterest<br /> <br /> Pictures and videos of Lions, Campus Lions clubs and Leos performing service around the world are posted daily here. Pinterest was the fastest site ever to break through the 10 million unique visitor mark. See what the fuss is all about.<br />

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