Lion November 2013 : Page 26

These Are A Few of Our Favorite Things by Jay Copp Lions are spirited. What’s in our hearts drives our service. It can’t be touched, measured or seen. Yet objects can help us reach our objectives. They are totems of the good will of Lions. Inanimate objects reveal the passion for service. Their outward beauty reflects the attractive kindness motivating Lions. Each year since 1990 Fairmount Lions in Indiana remember their most famous son with a collectable pin. The club makes 1,000 pins of James Dean, who grew up on a farm near Fairmount. The 1949 graduate of Fairmount High School was “a brilliant senior guard,” according to the yearbook. The “anniversary” on the pin refers to the year of his death. Pin proceeds fund a scholarship for a high school senior. Dean will live on in another way thanks to the club. Lions recently removed the stage from the old Fairmount High School, where Dean first acted, and will rebuild it in a new park pavilion. 26 LION NOVEMBER 2013

These Are a Few of Our Favorite Things

Jay Copp

Lions are spirited. What’s in our hearts drives our service. It can’t be touched, measured or seen. Yet objects can help us reach our objectives. They are totems of the good will of Lions. Inanimate objects reveal the passion for service. Their outward beauty reflects the attractive kindness motivating Lions.<br /> <br /> Each year since 1990 Fairmount Lions in Indiana remember their most famous son with a collectable pin. The club makes 1,000 pins of James Dean, who grew up on a farm near Fairmount. The 1949 graduate of Fairmount High School was “a brilliant senior guard,” according to the yearbook. The “anniversary” on the pin refers to the year of his death. Pin proceeds fund a scholarship for a high school senior. Dean will live on in another way thanks to the club. Lions recently removed the stage from the old Fairmount High School, where Dean first acted, and will rebuild it in a new park pavilion.<br /> <br /> Camden Lions in Maine commemorated the 50th anniversary of their annual Christmas star on Mt. Battie in 2011 with a poster. The 19- by 27-inch poster sold for $5.95. The star, placed on an old tower honoring World War I veterans, glows majestically from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Eve. A rounded, rocky knob, the 800-foot Mt. Battie forms a scenic backdrop to the town and harbor. Lions must ascend the mountain each day to refill a generator with gas.<br /> <br /> Eight youths died in car accidents in a short span in Manheim, Pennsylvania; five of them played on the popular high school football team. So Manheim Lions sold prints of the school’s football field and used the funds to offer a voluntary handson defensive driving course. The prints sold for $75. About 300 teenagers have taken the BRAKES course (Be Responsible And Keep Everyone Safe).<br /> <br /> If Lions are part of their fabric of our communities, shouldn’t we embrace the iconic places and events within our communities? Yes, say the Middlebury Lions in Connecticut. For nearly a decade they’ve created and sold Christmas ornaments with themes that resonate with residents. Scenes depicted include sledding on the Town Green, skating on a local pond, the annual tree lighting, a local school and the encampment during the Revolutionary War of French General Rochambeau, hurrying to join General Washington to defeat Cornwallis at Yorktown. Last year’s ornament celebrated Johnny’s Dairy Bar, a hot dog stand that opened in 1952. Lions and other Middle burians worked the counter or downed sodas, devoured the 25-cent, foot-long hot dogs, traded stories, jokes and furtive looks of longing and otherwise acted like the teenagers they once were.<br /> <br /> A 90-minute drive from Dublin, Roscrea once sat on the ancient highway of Ireland known as the “Slighe Dala” (Parliament Way). The small picturesque town is dotted with old monasteries, churches and castles. Roscrea Lions took advantage of the beauty that surrounds them by selling Christmas cards featuring historic sites. Lion Brian Redmond took the photos. A packet of eight cards sold for eight euros (about US$11).<br /> <br /> Bowie Lions in Maryland wanted a “wow factor” as part of their 50th charter night. So Kaleidoscopes to You in Iowa came up with a Lions kaleidoscope for members. Speakers at club meetings also now leave with it as a keepsake. Makes you see Lions in a whole new way.<br /> <br /> A columnist from the Oakland Tribune in California praised the new planters in the attractive Montclair neighborhood: “Not since the days when shopkeepers swept their sidewalks have I seen this kind of community pride.” Oakland Montclair Lions recruited Gina Dominguez of Snapshot Mosaics to create intricate mosaics that include a Lions Club logo for planters scattered throughout the hillside, tree covered neighborhood.<br /> <br /> Gig Harbor, Washington, ends up on magazine lists of “best small towns” or in newspaper stories on weekend getaways. Located near the towering Tacoma Narrows Bridge, the town of 7,000 on Puget Sound has boutiques, fine dining, and most of all, a picture-perfect waterfront. Gig Harbor Lions leverage the attractiveness of their town by producing a calendar with gallery-quality photographs. Lions believed their 2012 calendar was especially well-done, so they printed 5,000 calendars instead of the usual 500. The club had no trouble selling them.<br /> <br /> Maybe you’re in the mood for something routine like a casserole or taco dip. Or maybe you’re game for something more exotic like a moose and squirrel meatball. The cookbook of the Mad River Lions in Ohio has something for every palate: 430 recipes for appetizers, soups, salads, main courses and desserts submitted by club members, other Lions and residents. The cookbook committee included Russ and Alesha Stringfellow, who designed the cover.<br /> <br /> For 75 years high school football stars in and near Erie have battled in the Save-An-Eye Game. Held by the Erie Lions, the game has raised more than $3 million for eye care for needy children through The Sight Center of Northwest Pennsylvania. Last summer a colorful Save-An-Eye history book was published, and NFL Films sent a crew to work on a feature about retired fullback Brian Milne, who played in the all-star game.

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