Trade Only Sample TO.08.09.Sample : Page 1

Nordhavn boss sees industry ‘cleansing’ — P. 8 Web sales strategies from the pros — P. 16 August 2009 Americans’ personal savings rate* During recent boom and bust periods ® 1981 Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 1991 1987 2009 1999 12.5% 6.2% 1980s WWW.TRADEONLYTODAY.COM $5.00 A new boatbuilding universe evolving I SPECIAL REPORT By Reagan Haynes n this depressed marine sales envi- ronment, manufacturers are mak- ing systemic overhauls to the way they build boats. The changes are af- fecting everything from where boats and engines are built to how they are built and sold. Some of the changes will be permanent, while others will linger long after the economy recovers, many believe. Dealers could see significant changes in the way they do business, such as greater use of catalogs and Web sites, a trend toward smaller showrooms, and boats with fewer options and pushed- back model years. The marine industry business model is undergoing a sea change. “There’s a huge benefit to a new pro- See Change, Page 34 ‘Boutique’ MAATS generates some energy Lower fuel prices are benefiting the aftermarket segment, exhibitors say By Beth Rosenberg / Associate Editor b.rosenberg@tradeonlytoday.com While organizers didn’t expect to break any attendance records, early indications were that this year’s Marine After- market Accessories Trade Show was a success. The ninth an- nual show took place July 15-17 at the Orange Country Con- vention Center in Orlando, Fla. — the first time it wasn’t held in Las Vegas. “[Exhibitors were] not coming in with doom and gloom,” says Ben Wold, executive vice president of the National Ma- rine Manufacturers Association, which organized the show. “This is an opportunity to do business. … I think they’re being realistic, but with some decent expectations.” MAATS, he notes, is not about getting the highest possible number of attendees but attracting people with buying power. “It’s a different beast,” he said early in the show. “It’s a boutique show.” While boat sales remain down, the aftermarket is stronger, with some exhibitors reporting an uptick in sales of 10 to 15 See MAATS, Page 49 HEARD IT HERE FIRST “Stupid things will be gone when this [the recession] is all over. Ridiculous, ill-conceived, ugly boats, overpriced products and services, lazy people … ” — Nordhavn president Dan Streech With our boating business in transi- tion, new challenges require fresh and innovative paths to success. There are plenty of new ideas for dealers to consider in this year’s Busi- ness Management Solutions. Pages 39-48 7.9% 1.4% 1990s -2.7% 2005 6.9% 2000s *as a percentage of disposable personal income INSIDE Plus + + Fuel efficiency + Calls for lighter, more efficient boats and smaller engines have largely gone unheeded, but volatile fuel prices and the recession are changing that. Page 20 Winds of change It took just an instant for a tornado to wipe out Tennessee builder Gibson Boats. Now there’s a “new Gibson,” smaller but attuned to its customers, building better boats in a better plant. Page 29 Turning nasty The Genmar bankruptcy proceedings are getting acrimonious. Irwin Jacobs calls efforts to form a dealer committee “obnoxious and insulting,” while dealer lawyers talk of “coercion” and warn bankruptcy can be a “ruthless” process. Page 30 ADVERTISING SPECIAL Business Solutions 2009 RECESSION RECESSION RECESSION

A New Boatbuilding Universe Evolving

Reagan Haynes

I n this depressed marine sales environment, manufacturers are making systemic overhauls to the way they build boats. The changes are affecting everything from where boats and engines are built to how they are built and sold. Some of the changes will be permanent, while others will linger long after the economy recovers, many believe.<br /> <br /> Dealers could see significant changes in the way they do business, such as greater use of catalogs and Web sites, a trend toward smaller showrooms, and boats with fewer options and pushedback model years.<br /> <br /> “There’s a huge benefit to a new pro-......

Boutique Maats Generates Some Energy

Beth Rosenberg

Lower fuel prices are benefiting the aftermarket segment, exhibitors say<br /> <br /> While organizers didn’t expect to break any attendance records, early indications were that this year’s Marine Aftermarket Accessories Trade Show was a success. The ninth annual show took place July 15-17 at the Orange Country Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. — the first time it wasn’t held in Las Vegas.<br /> <br /> “[Exhibitors were] not coming in with doom and gloom,” says Ben Wold, executive vice president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association, which organized the show.<br /> <br /> “This is an opportunity to do business. … I think they’re being realistic, but with some decent expectations.” MAATS, he notes, is not about getting the highest possible number of attendees but attracting people with buying power. “It’s a different beast,” he said early in the show. “It’s a boutique show.” While boat sales remain down, the aftermarket is stronger, with some exhibitors reporting an uptick in sales of 10 to 15...

Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading