Gentry December 2016 : Page134

PHIL A NTHROPY Home Wanted For The Holidays Working to find some of the Bay Area’s neediest animals a warm and loving home this Christmas. he Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA’s Hope Program helps the most desperate animals by giving them a second chance at life. As an open-door shelter, PHS/SPCA accepts all animals regardless of their age, size, temperament, and behavior. “Some animals arrive perfectly healthy and need nothing more than a new loving home,” explains Communications Manager Michele Moyer. “Yet, unfortunately, many others need extra medical care, behav-ior training, or TLC before they can be placed into a forever home.” For some of them, PHS/SPCA is their only chance. The Hope Program saves an average of 200 animals every month. “Thanks to generous support, this number keeps growing,” shares Moyer. The story of the Hope Program dates back several decades. A PHS/SPCA officer was called to a scene where a tan and white Australian Shepherd mix was dying—an apparent, yet inexplicable, stab-bing victim. “Staff veterinarians A Story of Hope felt the frightened dog would not make it through the night and doubted she would ever trust another human, yet she was given pain medication and sup-portive care,” shares Moyer. The following day, the brave beauty showed a flicker of promise; she began eating and even wagged her tail. Named “Hope” by those charged with her care, she was on the road to wellness. Over time, Hope’s circle of friends at the shelter grew, as did the number of interested adopters. One very persistent volunteer adopted Hope and gave her fabulous years of her love and care. Moyer explains, “Hope’s story inspired PHS/SPCA’s Hope Program, which would go on to care for countless animals like her who need specialty care before being made well enough for adoption.” Today, the program is known to benefit both the adopter and the adoptee. When faced with a major life challenge, the answer for one SPCA adopter was to “adopt a cat who’s faced similar circum-stances!” Diagnosed with cancer years ago, Carol Powers under-went treatments and has been cancer-free for five years. Prada, a sweet 11-year-old who came to PHS/SPCA back in March with cancerous lesions on her ears, needed someone to look past her T Carol Powers and Prada advanced age and “imperfections.” Skilled veterinary staff removed parts of her ears to save her life. Prada quickly became a staff and volunteer favorite thanks to her gentle, loving nature. Carol was drawn to Prada’s story and thought of the ears as evidence of her recovery, and she adopted Prada in late May. When asked about the importance of the Hope Program dur-ing the holiday season, Moyer explains, “We accept all animals in our community and care for them 24/7, day, night, weekends, and holidays. Their needs don’t go away while everyone else is on holi-day break, so we ask that you consider donating to, adopting from, or volunteering at Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA this holi-day season. ” N —CORRINE E. COOK Every month, donations to PHS/SPCA’s Hope Program allow PHS/SPCA’s behavior and veterinary specialists to treat the neediest of animals, giving them much-deserved second chances. If you are interested in learning more or are able to make a life-saving contribution, please contact Lisa Van Buskirk at 650.340.7022, x327 or LVanbuskirk@PHS-SPCA.org. Page 134 // GENTRY // DECEMBER 2016

Philanthropy

Corrine E. Cook

A Story of Hope

Home Wanted For The Holidays

Working to find some of the Bay Area’s neediest animals a warm and loving home this Christmas.

The Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA’s Hope Program helps the most desperate animals by giving them a second chance at life. As an opendoor shelter, PHS/SPCA accepts all animals regardless of their age, size, temperament, and behavior. “Some animals arrive perfectly healthy and need nothing more than a new loving home,” explains Communications Manager Michele Moyer. “Yet, unfortunately, many others need extra medical care, behavior training, or TLC before they can be placed into a forever home.” For some of them, PHS/SPCA is their only chance. The Hope Program saves an average of 200 animals every month. “Thanks to generous support, this number keeps growing,” shares Moyer.

The story of the Hope Program dates back several decades. A PHS/SPCA officer was called to a scene where a tan and white Australian Shepherd mix was dying—an apparent, yet inexplicable, stabbing victim. “Staff veterinarians felt the frightened dog would not make it through the night and doubted she would ever trust another human, yet she was given pain medication and supportive care,” shares Moyer. The following day, the brave beauty showed a flicker of promise; she began eating and even wagged her tail. Named “Hope” by those charged with her care, she was on the road to wellness. Over time, Hope’s circle of friends at the shelter grew, as did the number of interested adopters. One very persistent volunteer adopted Hope and gave her fabulous years of her love and care. Moyer explains, “Hope’s story inspired PHS/SPCA’s Hope Program, which would go on to care for countless animals like her who need specialty care before being made well enough for adoption.”

Today, the program is known to benefit both the adopter and the adoptee. When faced with a major life challenge, the answer for one SPCA adopter was to “adopt a cat who’s faced similar circumstances!” Diagnosed with cancer years ago, Carol Powers underwent treatments and has been cancer-free for five years. Prada, a sweet 11-year-old who came to PHS/SPCA back in March with cancerous lesions on her ears, needed someone to look past her advanced age and “imperfections.” Skilled veterinary staff removed parts of her ears to save her life. Prada quickly became a staff and volunteer favorite thanks to her gentle, loving nature. Carol was drawn to Prada’s story and thought of the ears as evidence of her recovery, and she adopted Prada in late May.

When asked about the importance of the Hope Program during the holiday season, Moyer explains, “We accept all animals in our community and care for them 24/7, day, night, weekends, and holidays. Their needs don’t go away while everyone else is on holiday break, so we ask that you consider donating to, adopting from, or volunteering at Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA this holiday season.”

Every month, donations to PHS/SPCA’s Hope Program allow PHS/SPCA’s behavior and veterinary specialists to treat the neediest of animals, giving them much-deserved second chances. If you are interested in learning more or are able to make a life-saving contribution, please contact Lisa Van Buskirk at 650.340.7022, x327 or LVanbuskirk@PHS-SPCA.org.

Read the full article at http://mydigimag.rrd.com/article/Philanthropy/2639703/358177/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here